IOSH 19

iosh

Get involved - run a session

The proposals to run a session submission process is now closed. 

At IOSH 2019 we aim to promote thought leadership through presentations led by passionate professionals who can share their expertise with a broader audience for the purpose of educating, improving and adding value to OSH as a whole.

Our conference will focus on: challenging the paradigms or ways of thinking and doing things, with a view to improving OSH management systems;  and introducing new knowledge and thinking, providing fresh perspectives which are at the cutting edge and forefront of OSH.

This year's topics (full details below):
Topic 1: Business and leadership skills
Topic 2: From compliance to competitive advantage
Topic 3: Leading sustainability and human capital
Topic 4: Collaborating with others
Topic 5: What we can learn from OSH research
Topic 6: Healthier workplaces
Topic 7: Future risks, challenges and opportunities

When creating a session proposal please take into consideration that this year we have sharpened the focus for each day, giving delegates a clearer choice between investing in a two-day or a one-day pass.

  • On day one, track sessions will enhance understanding in key topic areas of safety, health and wellbeing – and give delegates practical advice on how to manage the risks.
  • On day two, it’s all about the latest thinking and insight into leadership, strategy and innovation to help shape a world-beating safety and health culture and gain that competitive edge.

Please read the full guidelines before submitting your proposal.   Here are some tips on planning your session.

The proposals to run a session submission process is now closed. 

Deadline for submissions:
Midnight GMT on 17 April 2019

Authors notified by:
17:00 GMT on 24 May 2019

Topic 1: Business and leadership skills

This topic area focuses on how you can be a better OSH professional and a catalyst for change within an organisation. To take the next step as a profession, influencing skills must develop and the art of collaboration promoted. OSH professionals must develop advanced skills in identifying and utilising key performance indicators, particularly those related to finance, productivity and organisational performance in order to demonstrate the impact of an intervention. In addition, the fear of prosecution and the experience of fighting litigation has driven the OSH profession to generate huge documents and complicated systems of control which can impact on OSH performance as employees and managers can become confused. Remember too that the new ISO 45001 standard states that continuous improvement includes the consideration of simplification as a method of enhancement.

We are keen to hear from individuals/organisation that can run a session on one of the focus areas and/or that answers one or more of the questions below:

Areas of focus:

  • How to increase influence by engaging with stakeholders
  • Creating and maintaining an OSH culture
  • Project and risk management
  • Negotiating skills
  • Great communication and messaging
  • Building the OSH business case and value proposition
  • Engaging with employees and management
  • Communicating an OSH vision, purpose and identity
  • Building a mature OSH workplace

Questions:

  • Why should colleagues listen to me?
  • Do I listen to what they want or am I too busy selling what I have?
  • How do I convince them it was their idea?
  • How do you find out how important OHS is for your organisation?
  • How do you measure the value of an intervention?
  • How do you measure outcomes rather than outputs?
  • How do you manage interventions so that they believe that they achieved the aim themselves?
  • How do you measure the intangibles?

Topic 2: From compliance to competitive advantage

The OSH professional must develop a commercial understanding if they are to strengthen their influence in the workplace. As systems mature how OSH can contribute to improving the productivity and therefore profitability of an organisation must be considered. Having interventions that contribute to financial and productivity gains and not just act as a business ‘insurance policy’ means that the modern OSH professional needs to develop business skills and behaviours: being merely technically proficient with OSH is no longer enough.

We are keen to hear from individuals/organisation that can run a session on one of the focus areas and/or that answers one or more of the questions below:

Areas of focus:

  • Delivering higher standards
  • Defining best practice in OSH
  • Effective OSH leadership
  • OSH at the heart of business management

Questions:

  • How do others see the OSH profession, does it need to change, if so how can we change it?
  • What’s the difference between leadership and management anyway?
  • Who carries out the OSH function in your organisation: how do we persuade non-OSH managers to take responsibility?
  • How can you be a servant and a leader?

Topic 3: Leading sustainability and human capital

The original United Nations objectives and the associated aims of the World Health Organisation under this heading is targeted mainly at preventing harm to employees, yet it is the environmental lobby that has seized the initiative and dominated popular understanding. Global social security systems are coming under increasing pressure from sickness levels, early retirement and accident statistics are rising with the industrialisation of the developing world. Governments will be placing more pressure on organisations to keep people at work, healthier and for longer. That is what sustainability and human capital is about and the OSH professional will have an increasingly important role to play in achieving these global aims in their organisations.

We are keen to hear from individuals/organisation that can run a session on one of the focus areas and/or that answers the question below:

Areas for focus:

  • Getting the best from your workforce
  • Human capital and business strategy
  • Creating a sustainable organisation

Question:

  • Are sustainability and human capital an OSH issue?

Topic 4: Collaborating with others

This topic explores why the OSH professional must know what other business functions do and how they can best collaborate to utilise the strengths of others in the delivery of an intervention. Including a long-term strategy and ability to identify the incremental steps needed to achieve lasting changes in operations and culture.

We are keen to hear from individuals/organisation that can run a session on one of the focus areas and/or that answers the question below:

Areas for focus:

  • Working across internal business functions.
  • Implementing global standards.
  • Reaching out to other organisations.
  • The changing workforce (demographics, lone working).

Question:

  • When should we challenge other functions and when do we look for compromise?

Topic 5: What we can learn from OSH research

Research has an important place to play in keeping abreast of the consequences of changes in work processes, competency standards, allocations of responsibility, the introduction of new technologies and management models. OSH professionals need to challenge the way in which their organisations operate to improve safety. Engaging with research will help deepen the understanding of the OSH profession, challenge beliefs, point to new directions and is at the very heart of thought leadership.

We are keen to hear from individuals/organisation that can run a session on one of the focus areas and/or that answers the question below:

Areas for focus:

  • Research roundup – engaging with research; the what, where and why?
  • Case studies from around the world.
  • Using research to stay ahead of the curve in business.

Question:

  • How do you embed research themes and ideas into day to day practice?

Topic 6: Healthier workplaces

Preventing harm is at the heart of OSH principles yet the focus of many organisations for occupational health and mental wellbeing has been to introduce Employee Advisory Programmes and perhaps mental health first aiders. However, this only treats the symptom and not the cause and many of the things that can be done to help employees be happier and more productive are not safety related.

One weakness in many organisation’s wellbeing and health risk management is the effective control of occupational hygiene hazards and substances that have long term chronic health effects, some of which have recently been re-classified as carcinogenic (e.g. weld fume).

We are keen to hear from individuals/organisation that can run a session on one of the focus areas and/or that answers one or more of the questions below:

Areas for focus:

  • How wellbeing initiatives can drive business success
  • The role and impact of technology in the workplace
  • Building individual and organisational resilience
  • Managing psychosocial risks
  • Effective control of hygiene hazards and substances

Questions:

  • Should we start asking what makes employees upset and frustrates them in their jobs?
  • With the changing nature of the workplace resulting in many more employees working remotely or from home, how is this impacting on psychosocial risk?
  • Do we adequately incorporate the consideration of this risk when redesigning the tasks of employees?
  • How can you manage the psychosocial risk when employing a remote work force? (Including the concept of the lonely worker: those working with others when no-one else shares their specialism.)
  • In the UK statistics of those suffering from occupational lung disease or chronic musculoskeletal injury have not improved for over 10 years: why is this?

Topic 7: Future risks, challenges and opportunities

OSH is still a relatively young profession driving an industry of standards and definitions of good practice and in doing so has generated a bureaucracy. The impact of new software technology and materials have been considered in the recent past but is it now time to ask what the profession is trying to achieve? How do we ensure that the basics are right across our organisation, our industry, our countries? Are we fit for the future and does our understanding of OSH terms needs to be revisited?

We are keen to hear from individuals/organisation that can run a session on one of the focus areas and/or that answers one or more of the questions below:

Areas for focus:

  • Working in the digital future.
  • New and emerging risks. What are the implications for OSH?
  • How to be ‘fit for the future’.
  • How will the role of the OSH professional change in the future?

Questions:

  • How is the word ‘risk’ now interpreted and what do we mean when we use it? Is there such a thing as an incorrect use of the word?
  • Why must everyone in an organisation use the same definition for risk?
  • What are the implications and difficulties when trying to synergise OSH risk with business risk calculations?
  •  If we are to take the next step for the profession. If we are to use new business skills and behaviours to influence change. Then we need to be sure that we don’t lose sight of our OSH principles as we develop, but what are they?

Ideas for plenary sessions

Alongside our track sessions a number of keynote/plenary presentations will take place in the main conference auditorium. If you have an idea for a great speaker or topic for this year’s conference, please email  Sue Bull, our Conference Producer.

Sponsors & Exhibitors

Organised by  iosh

Official publication  iosh magazine

Official careers site   health and safety jobs